Pence 'unlikely' to pursue 25th amendment as Trump concedes election

clock
Pence 'unlikely' to pursue 25th amendment as Trump concedes election

Several Cabinet secretaries have informally discussed invoking the 25th amendment but Mike Pence is 'highly unlikely' to pursue after Donald Trump conceded the election.

Incoming Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer said he is urging vice president Pence to invoke the 25th amendment and remove President Donald Trump from power.

Schumer said he and Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, called Pence on Thursday (7 January), but that he would not take their call.

My focus now turns to ensuring a smooth, orderly and seamless transition of power."

Schumer said that if Pence won't act, Congress should move to impeach: "What happened at the U.S. Capitol yesterday was an insurrection against the United States, incited by the president. This president should not hold office one day longer."

Since Schumer's statement, a number of other politicians, including Republican representative Adam Kinzinger, have also called for the 25th amendment to be invoked.

The 25th amendment allows the vice president and a majority of the Cabinet to declare that the sitting president is incapable of exercising the duties of the office.

On Thursday night, Trump acknowledged in a pre-recorded video that he would not serve a second term.

The outgoing President sought to distance himself from the assault on the nation's capital, accusing violent demonstrators of "defiling the seat of American democracy".

"My focus now turns to ensuring a smooth, orderly and seamless transition of power," Trump said.

"This moment calls for healing and reconciliation. Serving as your President has been the honour of my lifetime."

Trump did not mention Biden by name, nor congratulate his rival.

This article was first published by our sister title Investment Week